Attention Grabbing Headlines are no Longer Just Text

I’ve been thinking a lot about B2B content marketing lately…especially as it relates to blogs.

Corporate blogging is the most effective way to build a community of followers, fans, prospects and customers. It’s  somewhat similar to journalism as it relates to format (lots of text) as well as the fact that you have to fight hard for eyeballs. Just as journalists learn to write great headlines to get attention, bloggers do as well.

But it seems now that great text headline is not enough. It needs to be accompanied by an image, some attention grabbing visual. 2012 seemed to be the year of graphics in blogs.

Here’s a few sites I like who do a great job of designing attention grabbing via graphics:

Now, the content marketer is not just a writer, they need design skills as well. And the trick is to be able to create content in as short a period of time as possible.

We work to do a little of this on the SalesLoft blog but still have a long way to go.

I’m impressed by the amount of design work that now goes in to blogging and hope to get better at it myself on the SalesLoft blog this year.

  1. I’ve been thinking about B2B Content Marketing (specifically blogging) as it relates to early stage startups. I agree that the best way to build a community is through blogging. If a startup is pursuing a SaaS based model, it is almost imperative that one of the cofounders have content development skills. Outsourcing doesn’t replicate the company culture and B2B content often is specialized, making the cost of content outweigh the benefits. Do you think this is going to shift the way SaaS companies look for core team talent? 

    1. It has for me. First off, I think it’s ok to not have content as a prior-competence, but you have to be willing to learn it. Furthermore content is no longer just blogging text. It’s media, movies, slide-decks, images, screencasts, etc. If you’re not moving forward with media, you’re losing the arms race.

      But back to your question. :)

      I hire two types of interns (and they are both creators). One creates software and the other creates content.

      In fact, some of our software is content marketing to me (ie. http://prospecting.salesloft.com and http://jobchangealerts.com).

      So maybe less about prior skills and more about future focus for the individual.

    2. It has for me. First off, I think it’s ok to not have content as a prior-competence, but you have to be willing to learn it. Furthermore content is no longer just blogging text. It’s media, movies, slide-decks, images, screencasts, etc. If you’re not moving forward with media, you’re losing the arms race. 

      But back to your question. :)

      I hire two types of interns (and they are both creators). One creates software and the other creates content. 

      In fact, some of our software is content marketing to me (ie. http://prospecting.salesloft.com and http://jobchangealerts.com).

      So less about prior skills and more about future focus for the individual.

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